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Is your child being bullied for a learning struggle?

Is your child being bullied for a learning struggle?

January 18-22, 2021 is National No Name-Calling Week and LearningRx is sharing some tips on why bullies target struggling students—and what you may be able to do about it to help your child.

How often are kids with learning struggles targets of bullying?

According to Pacer’s National Bullying Prevention Center, children with disabilities were two to three times more likely to be bullied than their nondisabled peers. One study even found that 60 percent of students with disabilities reported being bullied regularly (vs. only 25 percent of all students).

Why are kids with learning struggles common targets of bullying?

These children can easily get caught in an endless cycle: They’re bullied because their low self-esteem (and perhaps poor performance in school) makes them easy targets, and their fear of being bullied can cause them to avoid school, participate less in class or develop an inability to concentrate.

How do you know if your child is being bullied?

Barring no direct request for help, here are some signs and symptoms to look for:

• making excuses to avoid school                                             

• decreased appetite or sudden binging

• unexplained injuries or ripped clothing                             

• difficulty sleeping

• returning from school without belongings                        

• avoiding being alone

To learn more about ways to help prevent bullying, visit www.stompoutbullying.org.

To help address learning struggles, consider enrolling your child in LearningRx personal brain training. Programs can be done in person at a local center or virtually, but either way, your child or teen will be assigned their own personal brain trainer. Most students experience a huge boost in confidence and have graduated with much stronger cognitive skills that make learning easier and faster in ANY subject!

To find out what personal brain training can do for your struggling student, visit www.LearningRx.com.

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